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On Advertising Commercials
Wednesday, April 21, 2004
  Over the course of this Blog, we have analyzed four different television channels in an attempt to explore the targeted audiences in the commercials. Before beginning this Blog, we hypothesized as to what the targeted audience for each channel would be. For the Sci-Fi Channel, we hypothesized that the targeted audience would be a predominantly male, technology-savvy group. For MTV, we hypothesized that the targeted audience would be young adults, children, or people who have money to spend/waste. For ESPN, we hypothesized that the targeted audience would be men, specifically older married men. And finally, for HGTV, we hypothesized that the targeted audience would be women, families, and stay-at-home dads. Some of the techniques employed by the commercials were: humor, sex, cool appearance, peer pressure, guilt, and targeting specific groups. After analyzing the techniques and targeted audiences of the four different channels, we concluded that the targeted audiences were broader than we had originally hypothesized, most of the commercials were selling their image rather than a product, and that “effective” commercials were subconsciously affecting people’s views of the products once they turned off the TV and were in the “real” world.

Posted by: Matt Hendricks
Alison Brennan
Sean Hitchcock
Brian Boddy 
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  While watching HGTV, I particularly noticed this one commercial. The commercial was an advertisement for Singer sewing machines and it began at a woman's house who had a bunch of company over. It then centralized the attention to this woman who was aweing over the host's furniture, wondering where on earth she could have gotten it. She passes by some nice looking drapes, pillows, chairs, and couches. Then she continues to walk around the house adoring the surroundings until she passes by a slightly opened door. She peeks in and notices a Singer sewing machine. After that, she realizes where the woman got all her nice furniture, and she looks ahead and sees the owner of the house nodding in approval. The other commercials on HGTV where basic home appliance commercials such as Home Depot and gardening products. Overall, HGTV advertises efficiently and effectively towards its targeted audience of families, women, and feminine men.

Posted by Brian Boddy 
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  While watching HGTV, I particularly noticed this one commercial. The commercial was an advertisement for Singer sewing machines and it began at a woman's house who had a bunch of company over. It then centralized the attention to this woman who was aweing over the host's furniture, wondering where on earth she could have gotten it. She passes by some nice looking drapes, pillows, chairs, and couches. Then she continues to walk around the house adoring the surroundings until she passes by a slightly opened door. She peeks in and notices a Singer sewing machine. After that, she realizes where the woman got all her nice furniture, and she looks ahead and sees the owner of the house nodding in approval. The other commercials on HGTV where basic home appliance commercials such as Home Depot and gardening products. Overall, HGTV advertises efficiently and effectively towards its targeted audience of families, women, and feminine men. 
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  As our last commercial posting, we are posting on our favorite commercials of all time. For me, this is an easy call on a recent ad campaign. My favorite commercial is that of “Terry Tate Office Linebacker”. This is an ad for Reebok which does not sell shoes, or shirts, or any real physical object, at least not when it was originally conceived. These commercials sells an image, they are more for entertainment than actual product movement. It is sort of a “what if scenario,” a blending of the sports world and the seemingly mundane corporate work world. The seemingly omniscient Tate always knows when one has done something wrong and seeks revenge and punishment in true linebacker style….. brute physical force. Perhaps it is because I am a 20 year old male, perhaps because I have never worked in an environment such as “Felcher & Son,” but I find the hard hitting Tate to be hilarious. In light of this, the commercial is presented in a completely serious manner, presenting the good idea that this would be. The CEO of the company explains how Tate has been a God send to his business. This ad is extremely successful at selling an image. It put Reebok in a completely new light for me. There is of course the sports image, which is a primary function of Reebok products. Then there is the “fun factor,” where the company truly shines in this respect. The audience views the commercial and is entertained rather than enticed by a product. This is a powerful statement, which is that the company will spend money to entertain. It is still intended to bring in sales, to make you want to buy Reebok products, but it is done through making you like the company and the expressed ideals they stand for.

Posted By : Sean 
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Tuesday, April 20, 2004
  As a final blog our group decided to write about our personal favorite television commercial. One of my favorite commercials is a Kodak commercial for their in-store picture center which can scan in images and reprint them. In the commercial a small boy uses one of these picture centers, with the assistance of a store employee, to scan in am image of his grandmother when she was young and played women’s baseball. The boy uses the machine to enhance the picture quality, to crop the picture, and to print it out on an 8x10. Then the boy visits his grandmother, gives her the picture and asks her if she can still play like that. The commercial ends with the little boy and his grandmother playing catch in her backyard. This is one of my favorite commercials because every time I see it on TV it makes me cry.

Posted By: Allison 
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Monday, April 19, 2004
  One of my favorite commercials appeared during the 2000 Super Bowl. It was an advertisement for EDS Communications that featured a bunch of guys herding cats. The commercial was hilarious as it went through the trials and tribulations of a cat herder. In the mean time, the advertisement had epic music playing in the background to further develop the humor. Overall, I loved this commercial and more and more companies should use humor such as this in their advertising.

Posted by Brian Boddy 
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Saturday, April 17, 2004
  Our group decided to watch HGTV, which is all about home gardening. Before watching for commercials, I expected to see lots of commercials about gardening and home improvement. Unsurprisingly, most of the commercials were all about gardening and home improvement, while others were more focused toward a specific gender group. Home Depot seemed more aimed toward men. These commercials showed people actually using the Home Depot products in their homes, which actually resemble many of the home improvement shows that HGTV shows. There was a commercial for a hormone supplement for women called Avilmil. There were commercials for Macaroni Grill, which I perceived was aimed toward women, in hopes they would go to Macaroni Grill instead of cooking a meal for their family themselves.

Posted by: Matt Hendricks 
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Friday, April 16, 2004
  This week we are viewing commercials on HGTV. The first commercial I viewed on this channel was for home depot, but that was a bit too obvious a choice, so I waited for the next one to tickle my fancy. The next commercial was for kitchen countertops. The commercial opens in a spacious and luxurious kitchen, the envy of any home owner. The dim lighting and placement of the camera seems to bring the audiences attention to countertops. The narrator states “Your kitchen countertops are the busiest part of the kitchen,” implying that it has to be the most durable and should look the best. The commercial seems to bring this “busy” across in the scrolling of text across the top of the screen, text about the countertops. The commercial is advertising a magazine about countertops which has obvious placement on a channel that televises home improvement. The audience, though perhaps not directly in the market for countertops, is hoped to remember the ad if they are in the market in the future or might recommend it to their friends. Essentially the magazine is free so the hope is that the audience which thinks about home improvement will just go to the website and have one shipped to them. I think the ad is effective at what it set out to accomplish and is well targeted. On many other networks, such as the other ones we looked at in our blogs, the commercial would not be nearly as effective as on HGTV.

Posted By: Sean 
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Thursday, April 15, 2004
  On Home and Garden television (HGTV), there was a commercial for some type of siding. The commercial featured a small girl who is outside rubbing a piece of paper over the siding of her own house with a crayon. She then proceeds to go inside and cut the paper into many long strips and attach them to her own doll house, thus putting the same great siding of her house on her doll house. This commercial uses location and audience targeting because it is advertising a product for the home and because it uses a sentimental story, something that would be appealing to an HGTV viewer. Although it is a good example of location and audience targeting, it is not a good commercial because the product name is only shown briefly at the end. If I could not remember the name of the company, especially when I am focusing my attention on the commercials, then how is anyone else supposed to remember the name of the company?

Posted By: Allison Brennan 
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Thursday, April 08, 2004
  This week, our group was to watch ESPN and note the types of commercials we saw. Almost all of the commercials on the channel were “manly” commercials, integrating many stereotypes of men and their wives. One such commercial, which I found particularly humorous due to its view of women, was an advertisement for Dish Network. The husband was watching TV while his wife talked to him in a high pitched voice that could not be understood, but still annoying enough to distract him from his football game. Fortunately for the husband, the Dish Network that he has for his TV has the ability to pause and rewind, so he just rewinds to see what he missed while his wife was nagging him. This commercial would defiantly NOT be appealing to women, but since it aired on ESPN, there are probably more males than females watching the station, in which case, the commercial would be very appealing.

Posted By: Matt Hendricks 
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  I watch ESPN all the time so I already knew what I was in store for when I tuned in. All of the commercials aired are centered towards a diehard sports fan. Many of the commercials are alcohol advertisements, mainly Miller and Bud. One commercial that is constantly aired though is an Enzyte advertisement for male enhancement. Just about every commercial break these advertisements air starring a man by the name of Bob. Enzyte makes it seem like because he is on their product, every other aspect of his life is amazing. This is certainly misleading but the commercials are rather humorous. One of them has Bob negotiating with the Chinese for some type of business deal and the Chinese speak in their language with suggestive subtitles. Another has Bob attending a neighbor's pool party. Bob dives into the pool performing ridiculous flips in the process and while he gets out, his trunks are floating in the pool and he stands in confidence as all the neighbors gawk at his "goods".

Posted by Brian Boddy 
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Group Blog for Chuck Tryon English 1102 at Georgia Tech

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03/01/2004 - 04/01/2004 / 04/01/2004 - 05/01/2004 /


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